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Celebrating history: Lawsuit makes news in Hingham

 

February 14, 2014

Courtesy photo

This Hingham home was once the Hingham Sanitarium, another word for hospital. Operated by Dr. Arthur A. Husser, The sanitarium was at the center of a controversy 100 years ago.

For the sixth installment of this series celebrating the 150th anniversary of the creation of Montana Territory, news comes from the Feb. 13, 1914 issue of the Hingham Review.

The front page contained several articles of local interest, including a big basketball game between the towns of Hingham and Joplin with Hingham easily winning the game with a score of 61-14; a monthly schools report and a column about state apportionment of funding for schools with Hill County's figures announced; and a somewhat lengthy article about a lawsuit against Dr. A. A. Husser by a one William Stevens of Goldstone, who was injured working in a coal mine. Dr. Husser was called to treat the victim who lived 35 miles away, treated the injured man and told his family what to do if something happened.

When something did happen, they came to get the doctor but he was away treating another patient who was "in a dying condition" and the family was told to bring the patient to the Hotel Spaulding where he could be treated by a physician. The hotel had a room ready, but the family didn't bring William Stevens in, and they refused to go to Chester for another doctor. Stevens ended up "crippled," according to the article, and Dr. Husser lost the lawsuit, even though seven physicians told the court that Dr. Husser did everything he could do in this situation. The Review scoffed at this verdict. At the time of the writing of this article, Dr. Husser was petitioning for a new trial.

In happier much more progressive news, we also find on the front page, complete with misspellings:

Commercial Club Doings

Last Tuesday night the Commercial Club met in the anti-room to Kimpel's Opera House with about 25 members present. There was no real business transacted, except a summing up of the financial condition of the organization, after which a lunch was served.

The club now has a membership of 35, with no debts except those for which the money is forthcoming.

There will be another special meeting on the night of Tuesday, Feb. 24th, at which all members should be present. If there is no business transacted in which you are interested, perhaps there will be something in the lunch that will interest you.

Changes Hands

The Hingham Meat Market, which was purchased some time ago by F. R. Coit from H. A. Emanuel, was sold back to r. Emanuel again this week and he will do bussiness at the old stand in the future.

John Hermann, who has had charge of the shop for Mr. Coit, will now be employed by the present owner and will be found at the shop to wait on customers.

Rudyard's Newspaper

No. 1 of Vol. 1 of the Rudyard Dispatch, published by Guy H. Cormany, made its appearance last week, and is a well made up and newsy little sheet. We welcome the youngster to our exchangd list, and with it God speed on its mission of usefullness to the town of Rudyard and adjacent territory. Rudyard deserves a good newspaper.

Little paragraphs of local interest found throughout the paper include:

The antelope still follows people around the park hoping they might have some sugar or candy in their pockets.

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On Wednesday night Miss Hortense Kieknapp entertained a crowd of young folks of the Union Sunday school at a sleighing party. After the ride a delicious lunch was served at the W. J. Minkiewitz home. The remainder of the evening was spent in giving short readings and piano solos. The night was ideal, the ride jolly, and the lunch was great.

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About fifty people had a good time last night at the 'hard times' dance. The costumes were appropriate, and some of them were both unique and interesting.

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We expect considerable building in Hingham this spring, both businesses houses and residences.

 

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