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Celebrating History: Effects of The Great War

 

November 10, 2017



By Emily Mayer

The effects of World War I were widespread and inclusive. No one and no industry was untouched. Articles printed in the Nov. 10, 1917 issue of The Havre Plaindealer included price fixes for food and fuel, and Montana’s generosity in giving to the Red Cross. One of the young men sent to Washington state for training wrote to the Plaindealer.

W. J. LORIMER WRITES TO PLAINDEALER

The Plaindealer is in receipt of a letter from Private William J. Lorimer, who went from Havre to join the army at American lake, Wash. The letter is replete with interesting notes concerning local boys at the camp, among other things being the information that the entire company to which Mr. Lorimer is attached to is being transferred to “someplace in New York”. Not the least interesting portion of Mr. Lorimer’s letter is a paragraph in which he pays a high tribute to the work of the U. M. C. A. Efforts to raise $1000 for the army Y. M. C. A. in Havre will be launched by the local committee on Monday next, and it is hoped that the responses will be generous.

In other war news of local note, we find:

HAVRE FRIENDS REMEMBER THE BOYS AT CAMP LEWIS

Quantity of Smoking Sent to Them Yesterday.

”Tip” Rafferty, a member of the Hill county contingent in the draft army now stationed at Camp Lewis, Wash., left yesterday after spending a few days with Havre friends. In charge of Mr. Rafferty was a consignment of tobacco, cigars and cigarettes donated to the Hill county boys by friends in this city. While not given any considerable publicity, the fund grew to about $30, and this amount was invested in smokes for the Hill county boys. These will be distributed by Mr. Rafferty upon his arrival at the camp on Sunday.

BEAR PAW BRANCH AIDS THE RED CROSS

At a basket social given by the Bear Paw branch of the American Red Cross at the Taber schoolhouse on Little Box Elder creek, on the evening of November 2, baskets were auctioned to the gentlemen present at the following prices: Tom Felton, $5.25; Jim Flynn, $9; Ed Hunter, $7; William Felton, $6; Phil Hochmer, $6.50; Hank De Mars, $10; Joe Phalen, $5; Harvey Watson, $7; Ex Putna, $5; William Pece, $4.50; Theodore Solomon, $6; J. B. Kinsella, $5; Fred Olson, $5; Joe DeLorimer, $4.50; Henry La Dean, $5; Barney Fastje, $8; Adolph LaSalle, $2; Louis Boucher, $2.50, Louis DuBoise, 50 cents.

The following amounts were contributed:

M. W. Hayes, $3; A. W. Morrell, $2. Gross receipts, $106.75. Expenses were as follows: Music, $2.50; Postage, $1.75; Printing, $3.00. Net receipts left to $101.50, which will be immediately forwarded to the American Red Cross, Washington, D. C.

John B. Kinsella, Treasurer.

There is a typographical error that was printed in the Plaindealer in the preceding article. That should have read “Faber” schoolhouse, not “Taber”.

DEPARTMENT CURTAILS LOCAL BOY’S FURLOUGH

Sid Loranger, a member of the marine corps in Uncle Sam’s fighting forces, spent two days in Havre this week with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Loranger. Young Loranger arrived in the city Wednesday from Quantico, Virginia, where his division is stationed, and expected to spend the full 10 days of his furlough period here. However, he received a telegram on Thursday recalling him to the camp, and he left for Virginia on No. 2 yesterday morning. While only a surmise, it is the general belief that his recall means the early departure of his division of the marine corps to France.

This small paragraph was found on the front page:

Recent advices from American lake, Wash., are to the effect that Caleb Nystrom, one of the Hill county boys who is “doing his bit” for Uncle Sam in the new army, has become a member of the regimental band at the camp.

In the Society column, we find:

Dancing Party.

A small but very enjoyable dancing party that was given for Mr. J. C. Benson, who leaves soon for Russia, by a number of intimate friends last Tuesday evening.

Dancing was enjoyed for several hours at the Lyceum hall and a midnight supper was served at the Grill café.

A handsome steamer rug was presented to Mr. Benson as a farewell gift and as a small token of remembrance from friends who regret his departure, but whose best wishes will allow him to cross the seas.

Among those present were: Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Benson, Mr. and Mrs. George Bourne, Dr. and Mrs. D. S. MacKenzie, Mrs. A. M. Grimmer, Mr. and Mrs. Victor Griggs, Mr. and Mrs. George Hulfish, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Brodrick, Dr. and Mrs. J. A. Wright, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Hulfish, Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Carruth, Mr. and Mrs. Sid Hirschberg and Mr. and Mrs. George Forge.

Eastern Star.

The ladies of the Eastern Star gave a unique party on Tuesday evening at the Masonic temple. Half of the members dressed as little girls, while the other half donned the garb of the sterner sex and vied with each other in their attentions to the fair ones. Dancing, cards and Kensington were the diversions of the evening, and basket lunches were served.

 

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