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By Tim Leeds 

Local group will continue fair rodeo — but fair boar

 

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Local group will continue fair rodeo — But fair board likely to end subsidy

Tim Leeds

A recently formed group will continue to run the annual rodeo at the Great Northern Fair, but without a subsidy from the fair board.

"We're not here to pick a fight; we just want to make sure that we can keep the rodeo going," said rodeo committee member Chad Murnin at Tuesday's board meeting.

At the end of the discussion, the fair board tabled discussion of the issue until its next meeting.

The group approached the fair board last year to ask if they could pick up the management of the rodeo.

The board had been contracting out the operation of the rodeo, which was put on by Rodeo Co. of Circle for the two years prior to the 2010 fair. The local group said it could turn around the event, which had been losing money.

Rodeo committee member Clint Solomon said the group made improvements to the fairgrounds and saw increases in attendance.

"We're wondering what it will cost to put the rodeo on next year, and we're wondering if we'd get any help from you guys," he said.

The board paid $10,000 to help the rodeo committee put on the fair this summer.

Others at the meeting said their groups don't take any money from the fair to put on their events.

Andy Owens, a member of the Jaycees and the fair board, said the service organization doesn't take any subsidy for its annual demolition derby.

"We take that money out of our pocket to pay for everything," he said.

Bill Mangold, who puts on the annual truck and tractor pull, said he also does not take money from the fair and he works to make sure his sponsors do not conflict with the fair's sponsorships, as well.

Tim Solomon, fair manager, said continuing the subsidy would defeat part of the reason the fair decided to go with the local group. One reason for the change was to try to cut costs, he said.

Clint Solomon said that the fair board was getting a return for its money — the rodeo committee members made substantial improvements to the arena, which helps other events held there.

Murnin said the rodeo group put the money made, and much volunteer work time, into improving the arena.

"We put hundreds and hundreds, maybe thousands of hours, into it," he said, adding that the committee is looking for more volunteer help in its work.

Fair board member Missy Boucher said the changes should have been brought to the board before being done. The fair board had been working to make items portable to allow the arena to be changed for different events. The rodeo committee had made some changes that set that goal back, she said.

"Some of it's defeating the purpose we were working at," Boucher said, adding that, for example, the board wanted to be able to quickly switch the arena to run events like motorcycle races.

"We were looking at something we could take apart one day and put it back the next day," Tim Solomon said.

Murnin said the work by the rodeo committee was greatly needed. He said he has attended rodeos in many locations, and the arena at the Great Northern Fairgrounds was one of the worst he had seen,

Clint Solomon asked if the fair board intends to move the arena entirely. The rodeo committee would hold off on some work until the arena's final location is set, he said.

"We'll move it when we can afford to move it," Tim Solomon said.

Murnin said the rodeo committee would like to continue working on the rodeo and working with the fair board.

"If you want a portable arena, we're here to help to make it better," he said.

Clint Solomon said he thinks it will help everyone if the rodeo committee continues to put money and work into the arena. He asked if the fair board was deciding not to put any money into the rodeo committee's efforts.

Tim Solomon said the rodeo committee took some of the local sponsors who had been funding the fair. That money went to the rodeo committee and was lost to the fair board, he said.

Boucher said many businesses sponsored the rodeo thinking they were sponsoring the fair.

Clint Solomon said he made it clear the donations he sought were for the fair rodeo, not for the fair.

"Maybe they wanted to give money to the rodeo," Clint Solomon said.

But fair board likely to end subsidy

A recently formed group will continue to run the annual rodeo at the Great Northern Fair, but without a subsidy from the fair board.

"We're not here to pick a fight; we just want to make sure that we can keep the rodeo going," said rodeo committee member Chad Murnin at Tuesday's board meeting.

At the end of the discussion, the fair board tabled discussion of the issue until its next meeting.

The group approached the fair board last year to ask if they could pick up the management of the rodeo.

The board had been contracting out the operation of the rodeo, which was put on by Rodeo Co. of Circle for the two years prior to the 2010 fair. The local group said it could turn around the event, which had been losing money.

Rodeo committee member Clint Solomon said the group made improvements to the fairgrounds and saw increases in attendance.

"We're wondering what it will cost to put the rodeo on next year, and we're wondering if we'd get any help from you guys," he said.

The board paid $10,000 to help the rodeo committee put on the fair this summer.

Others at the meeting said their groups don't take any money from the fair to put on their events.

Andy Owens, a member of the Jaycees and the fair board, said the service organization doesn't take any subsidy for its annual demolition derby.

"We take that money out of our pocket to pay for everything," he said.

Bill Mangold, who puts on the annual truck and tractor pull, said he also does not take money from the fair and he works to make sure his sponsors do not conflict with the fair's sponsorships, as well.

Tim Solomon, fair manager, said continuing the subsidy would defeat part of the reason the fair decided to go with the local group. One reason for the change was to try to cut costs, he said.

Clint Solomon said that the fair board was getting a return for its money — the rodeo committee members made substantial improvements to the arena, which helps other events held there.

Murnin said the rodeo group put the money made, and much volunteer work time, into improving the arena.

"We put hundreds and hundreds, maybe thousands of hours, into it," he said, adding that the committee is looking for more volunteer help in its work.

Fair board member Missy Boucher said the changes should have been brought to the board before being done. The fair board had been working to make items portable to allow the arena to be changed for different events. The rodeo committee had made some changes that set that goal back, she said.

"Some of it's defeating the purpose we were working at," Boucher said, adding that, for example, the board wanted to be able to quickly switch the arena to run events like motorcycle races.

"We were looking at something we could take apart one day and put it back the next day," Tim Solomon said.

Murnin said the work by the rodeo committee was greatly needed. He said he has attended rodeos in many locations, and the arena at the Great Northern Fairgrounds was one of the worst he had seen,

Clint Solomon asked if the fair board intends to move the arena entirely. The rodeo committee would hold off on some work until the arena's final location is set, he said.

"We'll move it when we can afford to move it," Tim Solomon said.

Murnin said the rodeo committee would like to continue working on the rodeo and working with the fair board.

"If you want a portable arena, we're here to help to make it better," he said.

Clint Solomon said he thinks it will help everyone if the rodeo committee continues to put money and work into the arena. He asked if the fair board was deciding not to put any money into the rodeo committee's efforts.

Tim Solomon said the rodeo committee took some of the local sponsors who had been funding the fair. That money went to the rodeo committee and was lost to the fair board, he said.

Boucher said many businesses sponsored the rodeo thinking they were sponsoring the fair.

Clint Solomon said he made it clear the donations he sought were for the fair rodeo, not for the fair.

"Maybe they wanted to give money to the rodeo," Clint Solomon said.

A recently formed group will continue to run the annual rodeo at the Great Northern Fair, but without a subsidy from the fair board.

"We're not here to pick a fight; we just want to make sure that we can keep the rodeo going," said rodeo committee member Chad Murnin at Tuesday's board meeting.

At the end of the discussion, the fair board tabled discussion of the issue until its next meeting.

The group approached the fair board last year to ask if they could pick up the management of the rodeo.

The board had been contracting out the operation of the rodeo, which was put on by Rodeo Co. of Circle for the two years prior to the 2010 fair. The local group said it could turn around the event, which had been losing money.

Rodeo committee member Clint Solomon said the group made improvements to the fairgrounds and saw increases in attendance.

"We're wondering what it will cost to put the rodeo on next year, and we're wondering if we'd get any help from you guys," he said.

The board paid $10,000 to help the rodeo committee put on the fair this summer.

Others at the meeting said their groups don't take any money from the fair to put on their events.

Andy Owens, a member of the Jaycees and the fair board, said the service organization doesn't take any subsidy for its annual demolition derby.

"We take that money out of our pocket to pay for everything," he said.

Bill Mangold, who puts on the annual truck and tractor pull, said he also does not take money from the fair and he works to make sure his sponsors do not conflict with the fair's sponsorships, as well.

Tim Solomon, fair manager, said continuing the subsidy would defeat part of the reason the fair decided to go with the local group. One reason for the change was to try to cut costs, he said.

Clint Solomon said that the fair board was getting a return for its money — the rodeo committee members made substantial improvements to the arena, which helps other events held there.

Murnin said the rodeo group put the money made, and much volunteer work time, into improving the arena.

"We put hundreds and hundreds, maybe thousands of hours, into it," he said, adding that the committee is looking for more volunteer help in its work.

Fair board member Missy Boucher said the changes should have been brought to the board before being done. The fair board had been working to make items portable to allow the arena to be changed for different events. The rodeo committee had made some changes that set that goal back, she said.

"Some of it's defeating the purpose we were working at," Boucher said, adding that, for example, the board wanted to be able to quickly switch the arena to run events like motorcycle races.

"We were looking at something we could take apart one day and put it back the next day," Tim Solomon said.

Murnin said the work by the rodeo committee was greatly needed. He said he has attended rodeos in many locations, and the arena at the Great Northern Fairgrounds was one of the worst he had seen,

Clint Solomon asked if the fair board intends to move the arena entirely. The rodeo committee would hold off on some work until the arena's final location is set, he said.

"We'll move it when we can afford to move it," Tim Solomon said.

Murnin said the rodeo committee would like to continue working on the rodeo and working with the fair board.

"If you want a portable arena, we're here to help to make it better," he said.

Clint Solomon said he thinks it will help everyone if the rodeo committee continues to put money and work into the arena. He asked if the fair board was deciding not to put any money into the rodeo committee's efforts.

Tim Solomon said the rodeo committee took some of the local sponsors who had been funding the fair. That money went to the rodeo committee and was lost to the fair board, he said.

Boucher said many businesses sponsored the rodeo thinking they were sponsoring the fair.

Clint Solomon said he made it clear the donations he sought were for the fair rodeo, not for the fair.

"Maybe they wanted to give money to the rodeo," Clint Solomon said.

 
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