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By Tim Leeds 

Everyone urged to get vacinations

 


Health and Human Services urges everyone to receive vaccinations

The Montana Department of Health and Human Services reported Wednesday that the first cases of influenza had been confirmed in the state.

The cases were in Gallatin and Wheatland counties, and HHS's director urged everyone to be certain to receive a vaccination against the virus.

"Holidays are no time to be sick," Director Anna Whiting Sorrell said in a press release. "It's a good idea to get vaccinated before things get busy with travel, family gatherings and holiday events. Getting a flu vaccine now will protect you throughout the season and keep the flu from spoiling holiday plans with loved ones."

The vaccine this year protects against three strains of the virus, including the H1N1 strain, commonly called the swine flu.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this year is recommending that everyone older than 6 months be vaccinated, and caregivers of those children are urged to be vaccinated.

Many physicians' offices, clinics, pharmacies and local and tribal health departments have plentiful supplies of vaccine, Whiting Sorrell added.

Several cautions outside of vaccination can help reduce the spread of the flu. Those include covering coughs and sneezes, frequent hand washing, and staying home when sick to prevent infecting others.

But, "The best line of defense is to get vaccinated against influenza," Whiting Sorrell said. "This step will keep you healthy and help prevent the spread of this virus."

———

On the Net: Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services: http://www.dphhs.mt.gov

U.S. influenza information website: http://www.flu.gov

Centers for Disease Control influenza site: http://www.cdc.gov/flu

with it with helping control the spread of the disease.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this year is recommending that everyone older than 6 months be vaccinated. While the vaccine is not approved for children 6 months and younger, their caregivers are urged to be vaccinated to reduce the chance of those children being infected by the virus.

Many physicians' offices, clinics, pharmacies and local and tribal health departments have plentiful supplies of vaccine, Whiting Sorrell added.

People most at risk for complications if they become ill with the flu are the elderly, women who are pregnant and individuals that have chronic conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, asthma, or other conditions that reduce immunity to influenza.

Other people who are at higher risk of infection or are likely to spread influenza viruses to vulnerable populations are health care workers and caregivers.

Children are considered to be at higher risk in Montana due to a lower-than-average rate of vaccinations. A national survey found that in 2008-2009, an estimated 34 percent of the state's children aged 6-23 months were vaccinated compared to the U.S. average of 42 percent.

Children younger than 2 are at high-risk for complications and many end up hospitalized if infected by influenza.

Several cautions outside of vaccination can help reduce the spread of the flu. Those include covering coughs and sneezes, frequent hand washing, and staying home when sick to prevent infecting others.

But, "The best line of defense is to get vaccinated against influenza," Whiting Sorrell said. "This step will keep you healthy and help prevent the spread of this virus."

———

On the Net: Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services: http://www.dphhs.mt.gov

U.S. influenza information website: http://www.flu.gov

Centers for Disease Control influenza site: http://www.cdc.gov/flu

The Montana Department of Health and Human Services reported Wednesday that the first cases of influenza had been confirmed in the state.

The cases were in Gallatin and Wheatland counties, and HHS's director urged everyone to be certain to receive a vaccination against the virus.

"Holidays are no time to be sick," Director Anna Whiting Sorrell said in a press release. "It's a good idea to get vaccinated before things get busy with travel, family gatherings and holiday events. Getting a flu vaccine now will protect you throughout the season and keep the flu from spoiling holiday plans with loved ones."

The vaccine this year protects against three strains of the virus, including the H1N1 strain, commonly called the swine flu.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this year is recommending that everyone older than 6 months be vaccinated, and caregivers of those children are urged to be vaccinated.

Many physicians' offices, clinics, pharmacies and local and tribal health departments have plentiful supplies of vaccine, Whiting Sorrell added.

Several cautions outside of vaccination can help reduce the spread of the flu. Those include covering coughs and sneezes, frequent hand washing, and staying home when sick to prevent infecting others.

But, "The best line of defense is to get vaccinated against influenza," Whiting Sorrell said. "This step will keep you healthy and help prevent the spread of this virus."


On the Net: Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services: http://www.dphhs.mt.gov U.S. influenza information website: http://www.flu.gov Centers for Disease Control influenza site: http://www.cdc.gov/flu with it with helping control the spread of the disease. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this year is recommending that everyone older than 6 months be vaccinated. While the vaccine is not approved for children 6 months and younger, their caregivers are urged to be vaccinated to reduce the chance of those children being infected by the virus. Many physicians' offices, clinics, pharmacies and local and tribal health departments have plentiful supplies of vaccine, Whiting Sorrell added. People most at risk for complications if they become ill with the flu are the elderly, women who are pregnant and individuals that have chronic conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, asthma, or other conditions that reduce immunity to influenza. Other people who are at higher risk of infection or are likely to spread influenza viruses to vulnerable populations are health care workers and caregivers. Children are considered to be at higher risk in Montana due to a lower-than-average rate of vaccinations. A national survey found that in 2008-2009, an estimated 34 percent of the state's children aged 6-23 months were vaccinated compared to the U.S. average of 42 percent. Children younger than 2 are at high-risk for complications and many end up hospitalized if infected by influenza. Several cautions outside of vaccination can help reduce the spread of the flu. Those include covering coughs and sneezes, frequent hand washing, and staying home when sick to prevent infecting others. But, "The best line of defense is to get vaccinated against influenza," Whiting Sorrell said. "This step will keep you healthy and help prevent the spread of this virus."
On the Net: Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services: http://www.dphhs.mt.gov U.S. influenza information website: http://www.flu.gov Centers for Disease Control influenza site: http://www.cdc.gov/flu On the Net: Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services: http://www.dphhs.mt.gov U.S. influenza information website: http://www.flu.gov Centers for Disease Control influenza site: http://www.cdc.gov/flu

On the Net: Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services: http://www.dphhs.mt.gov

U.S. influenza information website: http://www.flu.gov

Centers for Disease Control influenza site: http://www.cdc.gov/flu

with it with helping control the spread of the disease.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this year is recommending that everyone older than 6 months be vaccinated. While the vaccine is not approved for children 6 months and younger, their caregivers are urged to be vaccinated to reduce the chance of those children being infected by the virus.

Many physicians' offices, clinics, pharmacies and local and tribal health departments have plentiful supplies of vaccine, Whiting Sorrell added.

People most at risk for complications if they become ill with the flu are the elderly, women who are pregnant and individuals that have chronic conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, asthma, or other conditions that reduce immunity to influenza.

Other people who are at higher risk of infection or are likely to spread influenza viruses to vulnerable populations are health care workers and caregivers.

Children are considered to be at higher risk in Montana due to a lower-than-average rate of vaccinations. A national survey found that in 2008-2009, an estimated 34 percent of the state's children aged 6-23 months were vaccinated compared to the U.S. average of 42 percent.

Children younger than 2 are at high-risk for complications and many end up hospitalized if infected by influenza.

Several cautions outside of vaccination can help reduce the spread of the flu. Those include covering coughs and sneezes, frequent hand washing, and staying home when sick to prevent infecting others.

But, "The best line of defense is to get vaccinated against influenza," Whiting Sorrell said. "This step will keep you healthy and help prevent the spread of this virus."


On the Net: Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services: http://www.dphhs.mt.gov U.S. influenza information website: http://www.flu.gov Centers for Disease Control influenza site: http://www.cdc.gov/flu

On the Net: Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services: http://www.dphhs.mt.gov

U.S. influenza information website: http://www.flu.gov

Centers for Disease Control influenza site: http://www.cdc.gov/flu

 
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